Three Things That Atheists Believe







Logic demands that atheists believe the following three points:










1) All the God-realized saints and sages through the ages were either delusional or lying.
Countless spiritual seekers throughout the centuries have achieved self-realization: the direct experience of oneness with God and all creation. Many of these mystics have attained astonishing powers in the process and were able to perform miracles that defy the laws of physics. Such stories have been well documented. For instance, Paramahansa Yogananda’s spiritual classic, Autobiography of a Yogi, first published in 1946, offers dozens of accounts of miraculous feats, many of which personally involved the author.

Ordinary people also experience the Divine. Moments away from death from Hodgkin’s Lymphoma six years ago today, Anita Moorjani underwent a profound near-death experience. She not only returned to her body, she completely recovered and is alive and healthy today. Her description of her NDE confirms the reality of life after death. Her case is medically documented and has been verified by physicians who at first could not believe that she was healed. Nonetheless, atheists insist that everyone who tells of similar NDE experiences, not to mention the literally millions of people who have been visited by deceased loved ones or angels, are also lying or delusional.

Of course, people who do not wish to believe in God tend to avoid any evidence to the contrary, choosing instead to remain intentionally uninformed. When confronted with such evidence, they will use whatever leap of logic is necessary to make an unexplainable event fit their preconceived notions. Ultimately, the temerity it takes to casually dismiss the lives and experiences of untold numbers of people who have achieved union with the Divine Mind is nothing short of breathtaking.



2) Subjective experiences cannot be trusted.
Granted, there is no shortage of people from every religious or spiritual tradition imaginable who will claim that, through direct experience, they know in their bones that they have achieved union with God and that what they believe is absolutely true. Undoubtedly, many of these people are deluding themselves. Yet, no matter how many people imagine such experiences, that does not mean that everyone who experiences God-contact has to be imagining things. To dismiss every such claim is to dismiss all subjective experiences, including your own, about anything and everything. After all, if you don’t trust anyone else’s subjective experience, how can you trust your own?

Given that God cannot be reached through the intellect but must be directly experienced, insisting that the only experiences that can be considered genuine are those that can be scientifically observed and measured leads to an endless Catch-22 loop:

Prove to me that God exists . . . God is beyond scientific proof . . . I want proof . . . God is beyond proof . . .



3) Ultimately, human life and the world itself are without meaning.
Certainly, all of us can find meaning and purpose in our own lives, in everything from our loving relationships and personal achievements to working to improve conditions for all of humankind. Yet if there is no Supreme Intelligence which governs everything and there is no afterlife of any kind, then the only conclusion that can be drawn is that from a cosmic point of view, no matter how much control we try to exercise over our lives, we live a random, pinball-like existence in a world devoid of ultimate purpose and meaning.

In other words, the world and everything and everyone in it are flukes of nature, and if we all return to dust in the next instant, so what? Game over and that’s that. Given that there is an undeniable order to the universe and to the unimaginably complex life teeming within it, it strikes me that such an outlook is at best, horribly misguided, and at worst, cause for depression and despair.



logic-of-living-a-spiritual-life-book-cover
Conclusion: I find it ironic that atheists turn to reason and logic to justify their argument against God, when, in fact, not believing in God (or whatever term you choose to describe whatever form of Universal Intelligence is governing creation) is ultimately unreasonable and illogical.

My eBook, The Logic of Living a Spiritual Life: Supporting a Life of Faith Through Logic and Reason, is now available for 99 cents on Amazon. Order it at GodIsLogical.com.






ABOUT PHIL BOLSTA

Phil is the author of Through God’s Eyes: Finding Peace and Purpose in a Troubled World, a comprehensive guide to living a spiritual life. Who will benefit from reading it?

Anyone who is on a spiritual path, or wants to start one
Anyone who loves life, or wants to learn how to
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To order your copy of Through God’s Eyes, go to GodsEyesOrder.com OR order from Amazon at GodsEyesAmazon.com OR for an inscribed copy, click here to e-mail Phil for information.

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Here is a two-minute video introduction to Through God’s Eyes.




Want to learn more about Through God’s Eyes? Here is a free 40-page PDF sampler from the book that includes:

• an overview of the book
• the complete table of contents
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Just click on the link below to download your free PDF sampler!
THROUGH GOD’S EYES PDF SAMPLER





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Phil’s eBook, The Logic of Living a Spiritual Life: Supporting a Life of Faith Through Logic and Reason, is now available for 99 cents on Amazon.

Order it at GodIsLogical.com.

In this eBook, you’ll find answers to questions like:
• What is the cornerstone of a spiritual life, and why?
• What is the secret to liberating yourself from other people’s judgments and expectations?
• Why is there an exception to “Everything happens for a reason”?


Those who worship logic instead of God are only half right. Not only is it logical to believe in God and to live a faith-based life, the existence of a loving, benevolent God that governs all creation is perhaps the only systematic worldview that explains every aspect of life.




Schedule a Mastery Mentoring phone session with Phil to learn how to apply principles of spiritual living more effortlessly and effectively. Priced affordably! Click here to e-mail Phil for details.



SiSe_fullcover_final.inddPhil is also the author of Sixty Seconds: One Moment Changes Everything, a collection of 45 inspiring, life-changing stories from prominent people he interviewed, including Joan Borysenko, Deepak Chopra, geneticist Dr. Francis Collins, acclaimed sportswriter Frank Deford, Dr. Larry Dossey, Wayne Dyer, Dan Millman, Caroline Myss, Dr. Christiane Northrup, Dr. Dean Ornish, Dr. Rachel Naomi Remen, Dr. Bernie Siegel, James Van Praagh, singer Billy Vera, Doreen Virtue, Neale Donald Walsch, and bassist Victor Wooten.

Here is a three-minute video that introduces you to Phil and his book. Click here to order Sixty Seconds. Click here to ask Phil to add you to his e-mail list for updates on his blog and books.

Reading this book is like spending a few minutes face to face with each of the contributors and listening to their personal stories. Click here to read unsolicited testimonials from readers. Learn more by visiting the official Sixty Seconds website.

Sixty Seconds was one of three finalists in the General Interest/How-To category at the 12th annual Visionary Awards presented by COVR (Coalition of Visionary Resources) in Denver on June 27, 2009.

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6 Responses to “Three Things That Atheists Believe”

  1. NotAScientist Says:

    “1) All the God-realized saints and sages through the age were either delusional or lying.”

    It depends on how you mean the word ‘delusional’, because it can also just mean ‘mistaken’. But yes.

    Humans delude themselves about all sorts of things. This isn’t terribly difficult to believe.

    “2) Subjective experiences cannot be trusted.”

    Not by themselves, no. No matter what ‘eye witness testimony’ is in a court of law, in the court of science it is the worst form of evidence.

    “3) Ultimately, human life and the world itself are without meaning.”

    What do you mean by ‘ultimately’?

    Human life and the world itself have plenty of meaning to me, and (I imagine) to you. Why should I care if it matters to anyone or anything beyond us?

    “not believing in God (or whatever term you choose to describe whatever form of Universal Intelligence is governing creation) is ultimately unreasonable and illogical.”

    I don’t see how you’ve demonstrated that unbelief is illogical or unreasonable. At least not in this post.

  2. Phil Bolsta Says:

    If you have reached this conclusion after reading numerous accounts of people who have achieved enlightenment, NotAScientist, I can respect that. If, however, you decided that there’s no reason to read any of these accounts because you already had your mind made up, then I stand by what I wrote.

    As for subjective experience, I can’t say it any better than this:

    It is one of the commonest of mistakes to consider that the limit of our power of perception is also the limit of all there is to perceive.
    C. W. Leadbeater

    As for your question about meaning, if you’re content not caring, great. That doesn’t work for me. A world with no meaning beyond what’s on the surface seems, well, meaningless. And I can’t feel invested in anything that is ultimately meaningless.

    Finally, every aspect of the world is so meticulously ordered that to claim that there is no intelligent organizing force behind it, and that all this order emerged from randomness, strikes me as utterly unreasonable. And the more I understand about human consciousness, the more preposterous it is to me that an individual’s consciousness is simply unplugged like a TV set at the end of life. The concept of a Supreme Intelligence governing everything is the only system that sounds even remotely logical. (To make this case requires an entire book to explain. I actually wrote such a book, which will be published in a couple of months.)

  3. craver99 Says:

    1) I don’t know or care if “all the God-realized saints and sages through the age were either delusional or lying” or otherwise. Mostly because, as you point out in point 2… (excuse my editing)

    2) “There is no shortage of people… who will claim that… they know… what they believe is absolutely true… many of these people are deluding themselves, (but) that does not mean that everyone who experiences God-contact has to be imagining things.”

    Since there is no way to determine the difference, I don’t see why I should assume any of them are true. Thousands of UFO abduction stories might just as easily reveal a percentage of real abductions too, but I don’t see any reason to assume any are real.

    “When confronted with such evidence, they will use whatever leap of logic is necessary to make an unexplainable event fit their preconceived notions.”

    Why is it a leap of logic to assume someone is lying, rather than assume they have defied the laws of physics? The latter is the leap of logic.

    “To dismiss every such claim is to dismiss all subjective experiences, including your own, about anything and everything.”

    Is that supposed to be profoundly scary?

    3) “Ultimately, human life and the world itself are without meaning.”

    Well as you pointed out in your response to the first comment, if it works for me, why should you care?

    4) “I find it ironic that atheists turn to reason and logic to justify their argument against God, when, in fact, not believing in God (or whatever term you choose to describe whatever form of Universal Intelligence is governing creation) is ultimately unreasonable and illogical.”

    Again, I don’t know or care if such an intelligence exists. If it wants to get in touch, it knows where I am. And it’s a long way from saying “an intelligence” exists to saying “God” exists.

  4. Phil Bolsta Says:

    Craver99, to assume that “everyone is lying” is an easy, one-size-fits-all answer that ignores, well, everyone and everything throughout history that you don’t agree with or don’t understand. To be so sweepingly dismissive is the easy way out; it is intellectually lazy. It’s akin to living within a tight little box and pretending that nothing exists outside of it.

    WHen you speak of defying the laws of physics with regard to an event that appears to transcend the natural operation of the Universe, you are implicitly affirming that we have an exhaustive understanding of Universal Law. Yet each new generation of scientists continues to unearth startling new discoveries—not only about the world around us but also about the world within us. As Saint Augustine said, “Miracles are not contrary to nature, but only contrary to what we know about nature.” Although the workings of divine forces are beyond the scope of human comprehension, the exquisite order in the natural world offers compelling evidence of a governing intelligence. Emerson said it best: “All I have seen teaches me to trust the Creator for all I have not seen.

    If it scary to dismiss all your subjective experiences? Yes, I imagine it would be terrifying. If you can’t trust your own instincts and own sense of right and wrong, of justice, of truth, then essentially you’re reduced to living near the level of an animal. Oh, wait, animals trust their instincts.

    Is it a long way to go from saying an intelligence exists to saying that God exists? That depends entirely on your definition of God. I like the way that ancient wisdom defines God, as “that supreme, loving intelligence that governs everything.” From that perspective, God is a formless, omnipresent and omniscient intelligence, not an old guy with a long beard who sits on a throne. If an intelligence is behind all of creation and bringing order to the universe, that fits my definition of God.

    But yes, you’re right. If your worldview and belief system works for you, then all is well. Then again, that assumes that you are happy with life and at peace with yourself. If that is not the case, then your worldview is not working for you. The trouble is, many people who are unhappy with life think that they are being realists and that no other alternatives exist that they can turn to. That is profoundly sad—not that they believe what they do but that they are unhappy. As C. W. Leadbetter so eloquently said, “It is one of the commonest of mistakes to consider that the limit of our power of perception is also the limit of all there is to perceive.”

  5. craver99 Says:

    Thanks Phil – I appreciate your time. Just a couple of things if you’ll indulge me…

    **PB** “To be so sweepingly dismissive is the easy way out; it is intellectually lazy.”

    I disagree, and I guess it depends on your definition of “sweeping.” I might say it’s lazier to be sweepingly *accepting,* and I don’t see how it’s particularly lazy to demand more rigid evidence for such extraordinary claims. In the meantime if I don’t see any reason to believe something, I simply don’t believe it, especially when it makes no difference to me one way or the other. Where do you yourself stand on alien abductions?

    **PB** “As Saint Augustine said, “Miracles are not contrary to nature, but only contrary to what we know about nature.”

    Then there is no such thing as the supernatural, and btw who’d have thought St Augustine was such a materialist and naturalist? Seems like all we have to do is wait for a scientific explanation, then.

    I like the similar Arthur C. Clark quote, that any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic. That being the case, prankster aliens are almost infinitely more probable an explanation for any unknown phenomena than “God” by any definition other than “prankster alien.”

    **PB** “Is it scary to dismiss all your subjective experiences?”

    Well I guess I should have simply said I think your reasoning is flawed, because no-one really dismisses *all* claims that are based on subjective experience. Your paragraph is not entitled “ALL subjective experiences cannot be trusted,” so your point is moot from the outset.

    **PB** “Is it a long way to go from saying an intelligence exists to saying that God exists? That depends entirely on your definition of God.”

    Or your definition of intelligence, or loving, or governs. If God is dependent on definitions, I am within your parameters to define God as non-existent.

    **PB** “If your worldview and belief system works for you, then all is well.”

    Indeed. I found it a great relief when I finally came to the realization that only God’s non-existence could account for reality as I see it.

    What presently irks me is being told what I implicitly believe, such as “atheists believe the universe came from nothing,” or “atheists believe everyone is lying.” The truth is, I don’t have – or need – an opinion on either of those things, other than to say they both seem vaguely more plausible than alternative explanations, and neither of them warrant any further investigation on my part. You can call that lazy, but we all have to allocate our own resources as we see fit. What if the aliens are watching me, preparing to abduct me and warming up their probes as we speak?

    Like I said, If “the intelligence” wants to get in touch with me, it knows where I am.

    Thanks again for your time. I really should let these things go, but I have such poor impulse control… :-(

  6. Phil Bolsta Says:

    Craver99, I completely agree that it is just as dangerous, if not more so, to be sweepingly accepting as it is to be sweepingly dismissive. That’s why I challenge people to expose themselves to the treasure trove of spiritual wisdom that is available to everyone. The trouble is, many people have their mind made up and see no reason to even consider any evidence that might contradict their world view. If you’re interested in learning more, I recommend “Autobiography of a Yogi” by Paramahansa Yogananda and this video interview with Anita Moorjani: https://bolstablog.wordpress.com/2011/10/08/anita-moorjani/

    As for alien abductions, I don’t care enough about the topic to have an opinion. That’s just a distraction from the higher goal of building a relationship with God.

    St. Augustine’s quote does not rule out the supernatural. Indeed, the so-called “supernatural” is entirely natural; it’s just currently beyond our ability to define and access. That’s why we use the prefix “super.” Elevate your consciousness high enough and there’s nothing “super” about it. This quote by Richard Bach sums it up well:

    “If you learn what this world is, how it works, you automatically start getting miracles, what will be called miracles. But of course nothing is miraculous. Learn what the magician knows and it’s not magic anymore.”
    Richard Bach

    WHere do you draw the line on which subjective experiences can be trusted? That’s a slippery slope given that the distinctions you make about the experiences are just as subjective as the experiences themselves.

    God is not dependent on definitions. You are also free to believe that the sun doesn’t rise every morning. Not believing in something doesn’t make it any less true.

    You write that only God’s non-existence could account for reality as you see it. Given that so many people have a different view of reality, how sure are you that your view is the one and only accurate one? If you are open to considering that you may not be 100 percent correct in your assessment of reality, I would suggest reading my new book, “Through God’s Eyes: Finding Peace and Purpose in a Troubled World.” It offers a comprehensive system for looking at the world. I strongly suspect that you and I interpret the same events quite differently.

    Yes, you do have to allocate your resources as you see fit, as do we all. But the fact that you’re even engaging in dialogue about such matters tells me you may be open to considering a different interpretation. Now if you’ll excuse me, I need to go warm up some probes.

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