Posts Tagged ‘pain’

How Bad Do You Want It?

December 29, 2009

In response to my post on doing work that you love, a new friend on Twitter just tweeted to ask if fifty-eight was too old to quit a job she didn’t like and pursue her dream career. No, not at all, I told her. She was still a spring chicken! The most important thing, I advised her, was to keep score with joy and love rather than dollars. It’s a question of priorities.

Whether it’s a different job, losing weight, a new relationship or any other change you’d like to make in your life, I have two questions for you:

• How (more…)

An End to Suffering

August 25, 2009

the-four-noble-truthsThe first of the Buddha’s Four Noble Truths is that life means suffering. It is true indeed. No one escapes this life without experiencing pain and anguish.

The three remaining Truths, however, offer hope and comfort to all souls everywhere: attachment to desire is the cause of suffering; suffering can be overcome; and finally, the path of practice that leads to enlightenment and an end of suffering.

God brings men into deep waters not to drown them, but to cleanse them.
John H. Aughey

Implicit in the Buddha’s teachings is the distinction between pain and suffering. Pain is physical and cannot be avoided; suffering is emotional and can be transcended.

Suffering can be a (more…)

Beware of Woundology

December 28, 2008
myss-caroline

Caroline Myss

We all suffer at times. Regrettably, there are those who use the authenticity of their suffering as an excuse to not heal. Caroline Myss coined the term “woundology” to describe how some people define themselves by their physical, emotional, or social wounds.

In Why People Don’t Heal and How They Can, Myss writes that many people hoping to heal “are striving to confront their wounds, valiantly working to bring meaning to terrible past experiences and traumas, and exercising compassionate understanding of others who share their wounds. But they are not healing. They have redefined their lives around their wounds and the process of accepting them. They are not working to get beyond their wounds. In fact, they are stuck in their wounds.” (more…)