Posts Tagged ‘triumph’

The Three Stages of Truth

September 27, 2013

gandhi-photo-then-you-win

Yep, pretty much. Here’s a similar take from nineteenth-century philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer:

All truth passes through three stages: First it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident.


Trying to corner the market on truth is like trying to wrap your arms around (more…)

The One Thing You Need to Know to Overcome Perfectionism

September 7, 2013
erin-dougherty

Erin Dougherty


This excellent post
by life coach Erin Dougherty cuts right to the heart of the compulsion to be perfect. I first gained insight into this subject by reading a wonderful and eye-opening book that explained the link between procrastination and perfectionism.

Here is the sentence in Erin’s essay that jumped out at me:

I never realized that perfectionism was an attempt to avoid all rejection, all criticism and all failure.

I’ve seen this fear control the lives of so many people I know and care about. Instead of making things happen and living a life of choice, they end up letting things happen and living a life of chance. The fear of criticism and failure is where dreams go to die. It makes me profoundly sad to know that decades from now, on their deathbed, so many people will experience the soul-crushing pain of regret at never having summoned the courage to follow their heart and chase after their dreams.

May Erin’s essay serve as a clarion call to procrastinators everywhere: Surrender to the indomitable spirit within you that ceaselessly whispers, You can do this . . . you must do this . . . there is greatness within you!



THE ONE THING YOU NEED TO KNOW TO OVERCOME PERFECTIONISM

by Erin Dougherty

“You’re imperfect and you’re wired for struggle but you are worthy of love and belonging.” ~Brene Brown

There’s nothing perfect about me and I’m ok with that…now. This wasn’t the case for most of my life, though. In fact, I’ve been a perfectionist for almost 30 years. I’m not counting the first five years of my life when I was free to be as messy and magical as I wanted.

In third grade I asked my mom to buy me a stack of lined notebooks and colored pens. I spent hours neatly labeling each notebook by class, date and assignment deadlines. If I made one mistake like a jagged cursive letter or a misspelling, I’d rip out the page and begin again on a fresh sheet.

This was tiring but it was also a compulsion. Everything had to be (more…)

Jin and Jorg

February 5, 2012

BOOK TRAILER FOR “MAJOR DREAM” BY JIN ROBERTSON




Today, the third day of a three-day seminar entitled “The Language of Impact,” in Los Angeles, I saw two of the one hundred twenty attendees talking to each other during a break. I walked up to Jin Robertson and Jorg Winterlach and said, “Excuse me, I just want to say that you both are amazing. You inspire me.” As the three of us talked for the next few minutes, I was thinking how incredible it was that our lives—Jin lives in South Korea, Jorg lives in Germany, and I live in California—had intersected at that moment in time.

Dr. Jin Kyu Robertson

Jin had come to America at age twenty-two in response to a South Korean newspaper ad looking for a housemaid. She had a one-way ticket, a hundred dollars, and very little English. Six years later, to escape her husband’s abuse, she entered the U.S. Army, where she rose to a rank of Major. She went on to earn a Ph.D. in International Relations History from Harvard. Her daughter followed in her footsteps, earning a Harvard degree and then entering the U.S. Army; she is now a Major serving in Pakistan. Jin is now Korea’s most popular motivational speaker, and her book, Major Dream: From Immigrant Housemaid to Harvard Ph.D., has sold more than half a million copies and prevented numerous suicides in Korea.


Jorg Winterlach



Jorg grew up in East Berlin under communism, forced to (more…)

When Life Kicks You Down, Kick Back

January 11, 2012

The business of professional sports is unforgiving. It is a pure meritocracy, with no excuses tolerated for poor performance: You’ve got problems at home? I’m sorry to hear that, but I don’t want to hear about it. Leave your personal life at the locker room door and go do your job.

It’s an environment that is ripe for feel-good stories of redemption and triumph. Like this stellar story by ESPN.com writer Rick Reilly about San Francisco 49ers placekicker David Akers.


WHAT A DIFFERENCE A YEAR MAKES

David Akers had a rough ending to the 2010 season. Professional and personal turnarounds made for a different story in 2011 (photo by Jason O. Watson of US Presswire)

This is the show-stoppingest year for QBs in NFL history, which is how San Francisco 49ers kicker David Akers’ story ended up in 4-point font.

Too bad. It would look nice on Paramount Pictures’ summer schedule.

Yes, Akers, 37, had the finest kicking season in NFL history this year, but that’s just the riding-off-into-the-sunset part.

The crying-in-the-shower part was exactly a year ago last week — wild-card weekend — when his Philadelphia Eagles were about to host the Green Bay Packers. The day before the game, doctors found a tumor on the ovary of (more…)

The Schoolmaster of Life

August 5, 2011


The road to salvation is by no means a linear path; adversity and triumph melt into one another until they are all but indistinguishable.

Some of you say, “Joy is greater than sorrow,” and others say, “Nay, sorrow is the greater.”
But I say unto you, they are inseparable.
Together they come, and when one sits alone with you at your board, remember that the other is asleep upon your bed.

Kahlil Gibran



Thus, while you do not necessarily rejoice whenever life steers you into a ditch, you (more…)

Brad Stokes’ Triumphant Return to Life

March 29, 2011

Heidi and Brad Stokes

I’m reading the CaringBridge journal of Heidi Stokes, a good friend of mine. The pain and suffering that Brad, her husband, endured while he was waiting for his second liver transplant is unfathomable to me. But he refused to give up and leave his family with nothing but memories of him. So he fought. And he suffered. And he won. It’s been close to two years since his transplant and he’s doing great.

Click here to read a magazine article about the inspiring Stokes family.

Click here to read an update I posted after Brad’s second liver transplant.

Here is an incredible and inspiring CaringBridge post Brad wrote on September 18, 2010. The fact that Brad is alive today is a testament to what Heidi wrote in an earlier post: “We don’t just believe in miracles, we depend on them!”

Just got back from three days at Mayo – my one year evaluation. Mostly good news: liver function – normal, blood pressure – 115/75, cholesterol (total) – 109, bone density – getting better (was osteoporotic, now osteopenic), hemoglobin – 11.9 (for years I hovered at 8.5 – 9.5), ECG – normal, ultrasound (all abdominal organs) – normal and unchanged, kidneys – …….kidneys?…….hello?…KIDNEYS?!… Well, they’re angry. They are mad about the anti-rejection drugs. They are protesting, but so far their actions are non-aggressive. A lot of grumbling (Creatine = 1.9, renal clearance=30), but so far, no dangerous uprising. Some liver transplant patients end up getting kidney transplants. I’m not there, but I can see the danger signs. We may reduce my anti-rejection drugs in 6 months, but obviously that carries the risk of liver rejection. It’s a delicate balance, but I’m not worried. There is much discussion and drug trials going on looking at alternate drugs and modified therapies to deal with this. I’ve been extremely fortunate that medical science has always been just slightly ahead of my need for it. When I was originally diagnosed with liver disease in the 80s, it was a fatal (more…)

The Barn Burned Down

November 21, 2010

In her book, When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times, Pema Chodron wrote:

I have a friend dying of AIDS. Before I was leaving for a trip, we were talking. He said, “I didn’t want this, and I hated this, and I was terrified of this. But it turns out that this illness has been my greatest gift.” He said, “Now every moment is so precious to me. All the people in my life are so precious to me. My whole life means so much to me.” Something had really changed, and he felt ready for his death. Something that was horrifying and scary had turned into a gift.

I have heard this story in so many different forms over and over again. Heidi von Beltz, a former championship (more…)

Undeterred by MS, Lori Schneider Scales Mount Everest!

October 3, 2009

LORI SCHNEIDER INTERVIEW (1 OF 3)
INTRODUCTION




lori-schneider-approaching-base-camp-on-mount-everest

Lori Schneider approaches base camp on Mount Everest before reaching the summit

On May 23, 2009, fifty-two-year-old Lori Schneider became the first person in the world with multiple sclerosis to summit Mount Everest. Lori is also the first person with MS to complete the “Seven Summits” by scaling the highest peak on each continent.

Badly shaken by an MS diagnosis at forty-three, Lori left her old life in Steamboat Springs, Colorado behind, convinced she would soon be confined to a wheelchair. Determined to make the most of every healthy day she had left, she relocated to the small town of Bayfield, Wisconsin, where she conquered her fears and gained confidence in her body by (more…)

Patrick Henry Hughes: “I Am Potential!”

April 6, 2009

Patrick Henry Hughes was born without eyes and with a crippled body. Not only does he say he is not disabled, he plays piano beautifully and performs in the University of Louisville marching band. His book, I Am Potential: Eight Lessons on Living, Loving, and Reaching Your Dreams, was published in October 2008.

Wow.

Here is a story form the Louisville, Kentucky Courier-Journal about the Hughes family receiving a new home courtesy of Extreme Makeover: Home Edition. They certainly are deserving. I never cease to be amazed to read about the phenomenal (more…)